What’s new in May for Neurology features:

– Parkinson Disease: Treatment

– Tremor

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Parkinson Disease: Treatment

Daniel Martinez-Ramirez, MD

Department of Neurology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration, Gainesville, FL, USA

Michael S. Okun, MD

Department of Neurology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration, Gainesville, FL, USA

 

The recent Food and Drug Administration–approved drug Rytary is a novel designed capsule and delivery system containing both standard- and extended-release levodopa/carbidopa components that were designed to reduce the number of dosages taken per day. A recent randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of Rytary in levodopa-naïve Parkinson disease (PD) patients showed significant improvements in the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale and in quality of life measurements at 30 weeks compared with placebo. Rytary will need time in clinical practice to better define its role in therapy.

 


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Tremors

Alfonso FasanO, MD, PhD

Division of Neurology, University of Toronto, Morton and Gloria Shulman Movement Disorders Clinic and the Edmond J. Safra Program in Parkinson’s Disease, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada

Günther Deuschl, MD, PhD

Department of Neurology, Christian-Albrechts-University, University-Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Germany.

 

Among the rare tremors included in this review, orthostatic tremor (OT) is a unique tremor syndrome characterized by a subjective feeling of unsteadiness during stance, eventually occurring during gait in severe cases. OT is the only tremor syndrome with a pathognomonic frequency on surface electromyography of the legs while standing. Because of its rarity, epidemiologic data are lacking. Four types of OT are summarized: primary OT, OT-plus (co-occurring with other primary neurologic disorders), symptomatic OT, and slow OT.

 


 

As seen in Scientific AmericanTM Neurology.